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Capitol Reef National Park

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The Waterpocket Fold, a 100-mile long wrinkle in the earth's crust known as a monocline, extends from nearby Thousand Lakes Mountain to the Colorado River (now Lake Powell). Capitol Reef National Park was established to protect this grand and colorful geologic feature, as well as the unique historical and cultural history found in the area. From May to September, the park offers a variety of ranger-guided programs at no charge. These include guided walks, talks, and evening programs at the campground amphitheater.

The Fruita schoolhouse is a restored and refurbished historic structure located on U-24, .8 miles east of the visitor center. A recorded message describes teaching in a one-room school.

The blacksmith shop, .5 miles south on the Scenic Drive, offers a recorded message about life in a Mormon pioneer community.

The Historic Gifford Homestead, 1 mile south on the Scenic Drive, is typical of rural Utah farm-houses of the early 1900s. Cultural demonstrations and handmade sales items are available.

A picnic area near the visitor center provides tables, fire grills, restrooms, drinking water and shade trees.

Bicycles are restricted to maintained roads open to vehicular traffic. A handout available at the visitor center identifies and describes recommended routes.

Fishing is permitted in the Fremont River with a valid Utah fishing license.

Other activities in the park include hiking, camping, mountain biking, horseback riding, climbing and more.

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