Horseshoe Springs Skull Valley Utah

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To most people Utah’s West Desert appears to be just a large expanse of dry sage brush valleys and desolate salt flats. But hidden in this vast desert environment are locations that transform the landscape. Compared to the surrounding hills and valleys, Horseshoe Springs is one of these locations. Horseshoe Springs is located in Skull Valley and is one of the many natural springs in this area.

Horseshoe Springs Skull Valley Utah

The name Horseshoe Springs comes from its “horseshoe shape” created by two natural springs that converge together and continue to flow north into the Great Salt Lake. It's difficult to see the “U” shape while at the springs, however, if you view the springs from any elevation the “U” is apparent.

Horseshoe Springs is considered a warm springs with the average temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit year around. For those looking to soak, winter is probably not the best time of year, but in the summer heat a dip in 70 degree water would be a great way to cool off.

Soaking or swimming in the springs in just one of the many activities to enjoy. Bring your fishing pole and try your luck at the Largemouth Bass and Carp population that call the springs home.

After fishing for several hours and reading about others who have fished the springs, it seems there is more fishing, and not so much catching. The fish are very finicky and difficult to catch.

Fishing Tips:

Horseshoe Springs Skull Valley Utah

If you do plan to fish, be sure to bring worms as this seems to be the best bait. Also the water in the springs is very clear and you can see the fish swimming in the depths. If you can see the fish they can see you or anyone else who is walking around enjoying the springs. Once seen, you might as well put down the pole and go for a swim instead.

Don’t make the drive to Horseshoe Springs just for the fishing, or you may be disappointed.

Visit the springs to enjoy this unique beauty in this desolate environment. Also enjoy the many other activities available in the area such as, ATV trails, hiking, and visiting the abandoned town of Iosepa.

The next time you’re heading down I-80 take a few minutes and stop by Horseshoe Springs. Take a walk down the boardwalk, enjoy a soak, try your luck at fishing, or check out the imperative signs that share some of the historical facts about the area.

Planning Your Visit:

Horseshoe Springs is in a remote area miles away from any services. Be sure to have plenty of gas, water, and the proper gear on you at all times. Skull Valley in the summer time can become unbearable so be sure to bring sunscreen, a hat, and once again plenty of water. During the warmer months I’m sure there are plenty of bugs around the springs, so bug repellent is also a good idea.

Driving Directions:

From Salt Lake City travel west on I-80 towards Wendover. Travel past Grantsville, Utah to exit 77. Exit off of I-80 and travel south on SR196 (Skull Valley Rd.) heading toward Dugway Utah. The turn off to the springs is approx 9.8 miles. The road to the parking is well graded and passable by most vehicles.

Horseshoe Springs Skull Valley Utah

Other Information:

Horseshoe Springs is a Wildlife Management Unit (WMU)

Fishing and Swimming are allowed

A current Utah State Fishing License is required. See the current Fishing Guide Book for current fishing regulations. Catch and Release is recommended due to the low fish populations.

The area is patrolled by the BLM and the highway is patrolled regularly by the Utah Highway Patrol.

Please do your part and keep this area free of trash. Pack it in, Pack it out!

Open Year Around.

Other outdoor activities that may interest you:

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