Simpson Springs

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Simpson Springs was one of the most dependable watering points in Utah's west desert. It has long served mans needs, Indians used it and early travelers and explorers counted on finding water here. It bears the name of one explorer. Caption J. H. Simpson, who stopped here in 1858 while searching for an overland mail route between Salt Lake City and California.

George Chorpenning established a mail station in 1858, which was later used by the Pony Express and Overland Express (the mail companies built small dams across the water course to improve the reliable, but limited, supply of water). When gold mining started at Gold Hill in 1893 Simpson Springs took on a new importance as a station for freighters and stages until the mid 1920's. In the 1930's, the spring became the water supply for the Civilian Conservation Corps Camp located just south of the springs. Today visitors to Simpson Springs can enjoy a 20 unit campsite that offers picnic tables, fire pits, charcoal grills and vaulted toilets. It will cost you $5.00 per night and you are limited to 2 vehicles per campsite. Max stay is 14 days and checkout time is at 2:00PM. The campground is open year around. While visiting Simpson Springs you can enjoy many desert attractions such as, rock hounding, four-wheel-drive trails and wide open country waiting for you to explore.

Directions: From the southern half of Salt Lake County or Utah County, travel to Lehi Junction (Redwood road and Highway 73). Drive west on Highway 73 through Fairfield to the Utah/Tooele County line, turn left and continue west across the Faust cutoff of Rush Valley to the railroad town of Faust. Continue 2.5 miles farther to Highway 36. Head south for one-half mile to Pony Express turnoff as signed.

From Ogden or Salt Lake City, travel to Tooele via I-80 and continue south on Highway 36 to the Pony Express turnoff road described above.

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