Utah Historical Sites

Utah has a very unique and diverse history. From native Indians to trappers, traders, explorers, Mormon pioneers to cowboys. The big mining boom, to the railroad and then finally State Hood. Along the way pieces of history were left behind waiting to be explored. Dwellings of Utah's native Indians, to Ghost towns of the old mining boom to houses built by the Mormon pioneers. These sites have been set aside for our generation to learn more about Utah's past. Below you find a list of sites that we have visited with information about each.

Parowan Gap Petroglyphs

Parowan Gap Petroglyphs

The Parowan Gap Petroglyphs site is a must see and a quick detour from I-15 for those traveling south towards Saint George or north to Salt Lake City. This geologic “gap” cut into a mountain was created by an ancient river that once flowed across this stretch of landscape. The Navajo sandstone left exposed became the prefect canvas for the many petroglyphs that can still be seen today. It is said that some of these ancient rock writings were created thousands of years ago by the Fremont, Paiute, and Hopi. Read More!

Dinosaur Track Recreation Site

Dinosaur Track Recreation Site

Many times, when you talk about places to see dinosaur fossils in their natural environment the response is usually Dinosaur National Monument. However, as we continue to explore the great outdoors in this beautiful state, we continue to learn that remnants of Utah’s Jurassic period can be found all over. Read More!

Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm

Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm

Over 200 million years ago this area was a shore line to an ancient lake named Lake Dixie. As thousands of creatures walked along the shore, and the waves washed up plant materials, the tracks and plant materials were slowly encased in mud, preserving them, until they were found again millions of years later. Read More!

Newspaper Rock Recreation/Historic Site

Newspaper Rock Recreation/Historic Site

The Newspaper Rock Historic Site in San Juan County, Utah, is a rock panel displaying one of the largest known collections of petroglyphs. The rock face is 200-square feet and records approximately 2,000 years of early human activity. The first to make their mark were the Archaic, Basketmaker, Fremont, and Pueblo cultures. In later times the Ute, Navajo, and European Americans also made their contributions. Read More!

Harold Mill / Goshen Warm Springs

Harold Mill / Goshen Warm Springs

Just before you enter the town of Genola Utah, you may notice a castle like colorful concrete structure perched up on the hill side. This strange looking structure is colorful because of the layers and layers of spray paint put on by the countless graffiti artists over many years. Now, I have my opinion on graffiti and I'm sure you do too. However, this is not the typical graffiti, it's more like wall art. If you feel completely disgusted that someone would spray paint an historical structure, then you may want to avoid visiting this location because it's everywhere. Read More!

Iosepa Utah - (pronounced Yo-see-pa)

Iosepa Utah - (pronounced Yo-see-pa)

About 75 miles southwest of Salt Lake City lay the remnants of one of the state’s most unique ghost towns. Iosepa (pronounced Yo-see-pa) was named after Mormon founder Joseph Smith and a later church leader named Joseph F. Smith. Located in the desolate surroundings of Skull Valley, it’s hard to imagine the town was once home to immigrants from the lush islands of Polynesia. Read More!

Four Ghost Towns to Visit in Utah

Four Ghost Towns to Visit in Utah

Because Utah’s history was often intertwined with the boom/bust mining industry, it’s unsurprising that our state has lots of ghost towns. These sites range from streets lined with buildings to lonely outposts, but they all offer opportunities to connect with the past in a special way. Read More!

The Great Hunt Panel

The Great Hunt Panel

The Great Hunt Panel is located in Nine Mile Canyon. From the Wellington turn off, the rock art site is located approx 45.9 miles into the canyon. Although all the rock art sites you will experience in the canyon are truly amazing, be sure not to miss this one. Read More!

Nine Mile Canyon

Nine Mile Canyon

Known as Utah’s outdoor museum, Nine Mile Canyon is home to an abundance of well-preserved rock art. For 8,000 years people have populated Nine Mile Canyon. The earliest inhabitants were the Fremont Culture who occupied this area 1,000 years ago. Read More!

Buck Horn Wash

Buck Horn Wash

2000 years ago ancient Indians pecked and painted this rock. The peckings on the rock are called “petroglyphs”, and the paintings on the rock are called pictographs. The Buck Horn Wash Ancient Petroglyphs and Pictographs These drawings are on the cliff face right next to the main road through “The Buckhorn Wash”. These are perhaps the best drawings in the area that I have seen, they are worth the trip, and be sure to bring your camera the scenery is exquisite! This is one of Utah’s best kept secrets. Read More!

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