Utah Historical Sites

Utah has a very unique and diverse history. From native Indians to trappers, traders, explorers, Mormon pioneers to cowboys. The big mining boom, to the railroad and then finally State Hood. Along the way pieces of history were left behind waiting to be explored. Dwellings of Utah's native Indians, to Ghost towns of the old mining boom to houses built by the Mormon pioneers. These sites have been set aside for our generation to learn more about Utah's past. Below you find a list of sites that we have visited with information about each.

Harold Mill / Goshen Warm Springs

Harold Mill / Goshen Warm Springs

Just before you enter the town of Genola Utah, you may notice a castle like colorful concrete structure perched up on the hill side. This strange looking structure is colorful because of the layers and layers of spray paint put on by the countless graffiti artists over many years. Now, I have my opinion on graffiti and I'm sure you do too. However, this is not the typical graffiti, it's more like wall art. If you feel completely disgusted that someone would spray paint an historical structure, then you may want to avoid visiting this location because it's everywhere. Read More!

Iosepa Utah - (pronounced Yo-see-pa)

Iosepa Utah - (pronounced Yo-see-pa)

About 75 miles southwest of Salt Lake City lay the remnants of one of the state’s most unique ghost towns. Iosepa (pronounced Yo-see-pa) was named after Mormon founder Joseph Smith and a later church leader named Joseph F. Smith. Located in the desolate surroundings of Skull Valley, it’s hard to imagine the town was once home to immigrants from the lush islands of Polynesia. Read More!

Four Ghost Towns to Visit in Utah

Four Ghost Towns to Visit in Utah

Because Utah’s history was often intertwined with the boom/bust mining industry, it’s unsurprising that our state has lots of ghost towns. These sites range from streets lined with buildings to lonely outposts, but they all offer opportunities to connect with the past in a special way. Read More!

The Great Hunt Panel

The Great Hunt Panel

The Great Hunt Panel is located in Nine Mile Canyon. From the Wellington turn off, the rock art site is located approx 45.9 miles into the canyon. Although all the rock art sites you will experience in the canyon are truly amazing, be sure not to miss this one. Read More!

Nine Mile Canyon

Nine Mile Canyon

Known as Utah’s outdoor museum, Nine Mile Canyon is home to an abundance of well-preserved rock art. For 8,000 years people have populated Nine Mile Canyon. The earliest inhabitants were the Fremont Culture who occupied this area 1,000 years ago. Read More!

Buck Horn Wash

Buck Horn Wash

2000 years ago ancient Indians pecked and painted this rock. The peckings on the rock are called “petroglyphs”, and the paintings on the rock are called pictographs. The Buck Horn Wash Ancient Petroglyphs and Pictographs These drawings are on the cliff face right next to the main road through “The Buckhorn Wash”. These are perhaps the best drawings in the area that I have seen, they are worth the trip, and be sure to bring your camera the scenery is exquisite! This is one of Utah’s best kept secrets. Read More!

Dry Fork Canyon

Dry Fork Canyon

The rock art located up Dry Fork Canyon is world renowned and located along a 200-foot-high "Navajo Formation" sandstone cliff. These petroglyphs are located on the Sadie McConkie Ranch, a private property, but have remained accessible to the public, all they ask is that visitors do not damage the sites, and obey all signs. Nowhere else can you see more petroglyphs in one area that are so easily accessible. Read More!

The Hermit's cave

The Hermit's cave

The Hermit's Cave was constructed by a man named Bob Stinson. Bob served his country in World War I. Upon returning home from the war he learned that his girlfriend left and married another man. Heart broke he decided to travel to Delta Utah to visit his brother in 1929. Read More!

The Brigham City Train Depot

The Brigham City Train Depot

The Oregon Short Line Company was established in 1878 to provide the Union Pacific Railroad access to the Pacific Northwest. The company announced in 1906 that it would construct a modern new depot in Brigham City. The depot was completed and opened to the public on May 19, 1907. Read More!

The Brigham City Tabernacle

The Brigham City Tabernacle

Construction of the Brigham City Tabernacle began in 1868. Settlers hauled limestone and sandstone from the mountain quarries. Workers in the Co-op masonry department shaped and laid the stone. Mountain pine was cut and used for joists, rafters, beams and lumber for the floor, roof, pulpit, benches and doors. The women donated produce from their gardens and all eggs gathered on Sundays to raise funds for an organ, a silver sacrament service and ornate volumes of scripture. Read More!

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